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Author Topic: Character Generation  (Read 3358 times)

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Offline ob1knorrb

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Character Generation
« on: December 06, 2008, 08:51:26 PM »
This is where I am working out the modifications to the Standard HARP Sci Fi Character generation rules.  Subject to change without notice while I'm working them out, although doing up the first level for your character should be safe.

Level 1 will represent the basic stats and memories (i.e. skills) that you retain from your donor.

Level 2, 3 & 4 represent the cloning process and physical augmentation that the clone undergoes.  The choices for what you can spend DP's on for these levels will be fairly restricted. Guidelines on how to spend the points are given below.  Certain stats and talents need to be taken, but which level they are actually taken are flexible.

Level 5 will represent your Military Training

Questions can be posted in the Peanut Gallery
http://www.rpgrm.com/rmsmf/index.php?topic=3277.0
« Last Edit: December 29, 2008, 09:44:15 PM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2008, 09:14:55 PM »
Level 1

Available Professions
Dilettante
Entertainer
Merchant
Pilot
Researcher
Scout
Soldier
Spy
Tech

Stats
I will be using Option 2 where the character has 550 points to purchase their 8 stats.  All stats start at zero, but can be bought up on a point-for-point basis, unless the desired stat value is 91 or higher.  Use the table below to determine the cost per stat point

Stat RangeCost per Point
1-901
91-952
96-1003
101-10510

Races
Characters are limited to choosing Human as a Race.
I recommend but don't require that "Profession Adaptability" be chosen as a special ability rather than "Skill Flexibility" otherwise you will need to spend an extra 5 DP at level 2 when the Profession change takes place.

Quote
Profession Adaptability – All Humans receive a 5 point discount on the number of Development Points necessary for a change of Profession, requiring only 15 points instead of the normal 20.
OR

Quote
Skill Flexibility – Humans can select any one skill from a non-favored category as a specialist interest. Ranks in the chosen skill may be purchased at 2 Development Points rather than the normal 4 Development Points for skills within a non-favored category.

Cultures Any of the Cultures could be taken, although the colony worlds in Bughunters are not as well developed as those in the HARP game, some of the Cultures could just be slightly adapted to describe an area on Earth as opposed to an entire Colony world.

Skills
Pretty much all the skills are available except those dealing with Psionics.

Talents
Basically, if it's something a Human Being living on Earth today might have, go ahead and take it.  Any others, check with me first.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2008, 04:08:54 PM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2008, 09:46:56 PM »
Level 2-3

Professions
Spend 15 DP points to choose add an Additional Profession from those listed below (20 if "Profession Adaptability" was not taken as a special ability)

Researcher (Doctor)
Pilot
Scout
Soldier
Tech

NOTE: For this instance only you will get all of the Professional Abilities for your new Profession rather than just having to choose one of them.  However, you cannot choose to advance your original profession at future levels. (I may make exceptions to this if the campaign warrants it, perhaps with a DP cost)

Stats
Spend 10 DP to improve Strength
Spend 10 DP to improve Constitution

Talents
Choose one of the following Talents
Accelerated Healing (10)
Cold Resistance [minor] (10) [major] (20)
Dense Musculature (25) (unlikely most PC's will have enough DP's)
Enhanced Senses (10)
Heat Resistance [minor] (10) [major](20)
Lung Capacity (10)
Natural Astronaut (10)
Natural Gunner(10)
Toughness (15)

Any remaining DP's can be spent on additional Talents (see level 1 notes, Talents listed for level 2 or 3 can be taken as well) or on skills. 

NOTE: If your characters Donor's profession and Clone's Profession are the same and thus don't need to spend points on "Additional Profession" then choose two Talents from the list above instead of one.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2008, 09:12:34 PM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2008, 10:15:17 PM »
Level 3-4

Stats
Spend 10 DP to improve Agility and/or Reasoning (can split the DP's)
Spend 10 DP to improve Quickness and/or Insight (can split the DP's)

Talents
Spend at least 20 points on the following Talents:
Agile Defense (25)
Ambidexterity (20)
Blazing Speed (15)
Combat Awareness (20)
Dark Vision [Lesser](15) [Greater](30)
Electrical Sense (15)
Enhanced Scent (30)
Enhanced Senses (10)
Extremely Nimble (10)
Instinctive Defense (30)
Instinctive Evasion (20)
Intuition (20)
Lesser Resistance [Stamina] (20)
Greater Resistance [Stamina] (40)
Lightning Reflexes (10)
Machine Affinity (15)
Night Vision (25)
Physician (10)
Quiet Stride (20)
Regeneration [Minor] (15) [Major] (30) [Greater] (45)
Sureshot (25)
Talent from Level 2 list (at least 1 Talent must come from Level 3 list)

Any remaining DP's can be spent on additional Talents (see level 1 notes, Talents listed for Level 2 and 3 can be taken as well) or Skills
« Last Edit: December 29, 2008, 09:13:16 PM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2008, 10:22:19 PM »
Level 5
Regular level, Players can spend DP's as they see fit. Appropriate Training packages from the book can be taken, check with me if you aren't sure if a package is appropriate or not. 
« Last Edit: December 29, 2008, 09:10:41 PM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2008, 06:04:19 PM »
Here are some of the notes from the Character Generation section from the Bughunters book.  I haven't done any conversion to HARP yet and won't be using any sort of random generation for determining what MSO's are available.  I'm just including this to give you some ideas for what sort of roles you may want to design your Characters around.

5. Select a Military Service Occupation (MSO)
After Basic Training, each member of UTRPF is trained in a specific Military Service Occupation (MSO), ostensibly based upon the individual's natural propensities but actually dependent largely upon UTRPF's needs at the time and the donor's social class.
The MSOs availahle to synners are listed in the Synthetic Human MSOs table (more mundane MSOs such as Cartographer, Drill Instructor, X-Ray Technician, and the like are reserved for normal humans and are not detailed in this game), in two general divisions: Aerospace and Marines. Each MSO is further identified by pre-requisites for entry if any) and chance of an opening. Donor social status can increase this chance of opening, as shown in the Modifiers for Donor Status subtable.
To select an MSO for a PC, then, first choose one you'd be interested in playing. Make sure your PC's scores meet the prerequisites, then roll percentile dice, if the result is less than or equal to the listed chance of an opening for that MSO (as modified by the donor's social status], then
your PC can sign up for it: otherwise, you must choose a different MSO and roll again. Note that if you ever roll 96-100, UTRPF assigns your character to an MSO for which there is a sudden, special need. (i.e. the GM will choose an MSO for your character).

Keep in mind that the MSO your PC begins with does not necessarily dictate the character's permanent assignment. You will have a chance to choose discretionary skills for your PC in the next part of this chapter (Step 6), and you may have your PC switch to a different MSO at some later point; in fact, military services typically encourage such cross training.
A description of each of the MSOs follows, along with the basic equipment usually issued to each in combat situations; this equipment is more fully described in Chapter 5: Equipment.

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2008, 06:06:57 PM »
Aerospace MSOs
One of the original reasons for developing synthetic humans was to have them serve as star-ship crew members. It isn't surprising, then, that UTRPF assigns a great number of its rookie synths to starship crew occupations. The typical niches that these synths are assigned to are detailed here.

Protocol Officer: Protocol Officers are specially trained UTRPF representatives, highly skilled in the arts of diplomacy and thoroughly educated in the details of United Terrain law. As such, they serve as mission commanders, as synth team spokespersons in synth/human relations, and as official UT arbiters in disputes on humanity's extrasolar worlds and outposts.
Players of Protocol Officer PCs may choose occupational skills from the Humanities, Languages, and Personality skill pools. They must choose Protocol {Humanities} and are encouraged to choose Law [Humanities) and Bargaining [Personality].
Basic mission equipment for a Protocol Officer includes a stun pistol and a notepad computer.

Pilot: For UTRPF's purposes, the term "pilot" is used generically to refer to everyone from an ATAPC driver to a starship pilot. Obviously, however, more skill is required to pilot a starship than an ATAPC, and service ranks reflect that fact, as explained later.
Ailhough the military vehicles that BUGHUNTERS game PCs will generally be involved with tend to be highly automated, a living mind "behind the wheel" is extremely desirable, and sometimes even crucial-especially in times of combat or other crisis. Consequently, pilots are in high demand in UTRPF's synth forces.
Pilots are typically the ranking officers in charge of their individual mission groups, unless there is a Protocol Officer of at least equal rank present. Even then, command of a pilot's vessel itself is left in the pilot's hands.
Pilot characters may receive skills from the Computer. Engineering, and Travel pools; the Piloting (Travel) skill must be one of those chosen for the character. Characters with Surface Piloting only will be assigned to a surface vehicle (typically an ATAPC, those with Aerospace Piloting to an air or interplanetary craft. and those with Hyperspace Piloting to an interstellar starship. Note that a starship may well carry an ATAPC and/or aerospace craft in its hold.
Starting rank for hyperspace pilots is higher than that for aerospace pilots, which in turn is higher than that for pilots of ground vehicles, as explained in the "Determine Rank" section later in this chapter.
Basic mission equipment for pilot includes a heavy pistol with tracer rounds. a combat knife, a helmet and flak vest, and smartwear.

Navigator: While navigating an auto back and forth to work every day involves no great difficulty, even a simple vacation trip proves the value of having an extra someone to read maps and watch for landmarks. And when it comes to plotting interplanetary or interstellar journeys, a navigator becomes essential.
Like "pilot," the term "navigator" has a very broad usage in UTRPF, referring to anyone from the navigator of a planetary ATAPC or aircraft, to an interplanetary navigator, to a hyperspace navigator. The Navigation skill list in the Travel pool reflects exactly that progression. Navigators are typically second in command to their pilots, third in command if a ranking Protocol Officer is assigned to a mission.
Players of navigator characters may choose skills from the Computer, Engineering, and Travel pools; they must choose a Navigation [travel] skill. Planetary Navigation skill results in the character's assignment to a surface vehicle or aircraft, Space Navigation to an interplanetary craft within a solar system, and Hvperspace Navigation to a starship. Of course, a starship may carry surface, air, or planetary system craft inside.
As with pilots, starting rank is generally higher for navigators with more specialized Navigation subskills.
Basic mission equipment for a navigator includes a heavy pistol with tracer rounds, a combat knife, a helmet and flak vest, smartwear, and a notepad computer.

Engineer: The tools that humans have invented over the ages have grown increasingly more powerful and, by the same token, increasingly more complicated. The more advanced in design they are, the more maintenance they require. Design and maintenance of humanity's tools is the province of engineers, and the sophistication of the equipment UTRPF assigns to its synths makes the engineer character a virtual necessity on pretty much any mission team.
Players of engineer characters may choose skills from the Computer, Engineering, and Travel pools. and they must choose at least three Engineering skills, two of which must be Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Exactly what other Engineering skill or skills are chosen should be based upon the PC's intended arena of expertise. Typically, a single starship will have multiple engineers on staff, each specializing in a different area. 0f course, there are some truly expert starship engineers who are as at home with Islet Drives as with computer systems and enviommentai maintenance, but such talented individuals are few and far between.
Ranks for engineer characters fall within the enlisted range but may rise quite high within it.
Basic mission equipment for an engineer includes an assault rifle, one smoke grenade, one stun grenade, a notepad computer, and a small tool kit; more extensive but less portable tools remain in the ship's utility locker.

Doctor: When an UTRPF mission team is days, months, or even years away from civilization, as is the case during interplanetary or interstellar travel, what might be merely a routine medical problem on Earth can become a life threatening emergency aboard ship or on an isolated outpost. Consequently, medical personnel are pretty much a necessity for deep-space missions. One fringe benefit of being a ship's doctor is that during combat pretty much everyone on your mission team wants to keep you alive and well at nearly any cost so you'll be able to fix them up afterwards if they need it.
Ship's doctor characters may begin play with skills from the Computer, Humanities, Medicine, and Science pools. and they must have the First Aid skill and at least two Medicine specializations.
These characters are always of Warrant Officer Grade, as detailed in the "Determine Rank" section later in this chapter.
Basic mission equipment for a doctor includes a stun pistol, a notepad computer, and a doctor's kit, with more extensive but non-portable medical equipment contained in a ship's sick bay,

Cook: It may seem strange to include this as a PC career in an adventure game, but given the relatively small size of ship crews in the BUGHUNTERS milieu, synner cooks perform some very important mission functions. Their primary task, of course, is to prepare meals, but they also serve as quartermasters, keeping a careful inventory of supplies. Most importantly of all, UTRPF trains its cooks to perform as an unofficial morale officer, serving as bartender/psychologist/confessor to the other members of a mission team and working in general to maintain the crew's mental health. A side benefit of being a cook is that the PC's fellow synners will usually try to keep their cook alive if at all possible rather than face the alternative of computer-generated meals for the long flight home.
Players of cook characters may choose initial skills from the Humanities, Personality. and Sciences pools: they must choose the Cooking (Humanities) skill.
UTRPF cooks typically begin play in the middle of the enlisted ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a cook includes a heavy pistol with tracer rounds, a combat knife, and body armor, as well as a howler machine gun with HEAP (the latter is for use in ship defense and will not normally be carried by cooks assigned to an away team).

Gunner: Ship-to-ship battles don't occur very often in the depths of space, but when they do, an expert with mounted gunnery is a much appreciated member of any ship's crew. Such personnel are also called upon when a particular mission requires the emplacement of stationary and/or automated guns off-ship. And when they are not occupied as mounted-weapons experts, ship's gunners often provide a bit of light maintenance in the Engineering section's aid.
Ship's gunner characters may begin the game with skills from the Engineering, Firearms, and Military pools. and they must have the Gunnery (Military) skill.
Generally, these characters begin in the lower enlisted ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a gunner includes an automatic shotgun with flechette rounds, a combat knife, one of each grenade type, and a helmet and flak vest.

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2008, 06:08:43 PM »
Marines:
Throughout history, marines have existed for one main reason: to do battle. That has not changed in the 22nd century; the enemy has just become, if anything, even more dangerous.
Interplanetary vessels are intended to carry a pair of marines at all times as ship's security, and each starship should contain at least a squad of marines, preferably with one or more special troops such as scouts and heavy weapon specialists. However, UTRPF's resources are so overextended by the current crisis that most vessels are lucky to have just one or two marines aboard, forcing the ship's crew to serve double duty as ground troops with the marines simply stiffening the force of that contingent.
Marines are divided into the following MSOs, reflecting the role each plays when enough are present to assemble a squad.

Squad Leader: A specialist in military strategy and tactics (including at least a theoretical knowledge of a wide range of weapons), the UTRPF marine squad leader has the primary responsibility of leading any ground combat operations. Technically, squad leaders are under the command of the ranking officer of the ship that carries their squad, but in practice such officers routinely defer to the squad leader's expertise and give the marines great leeway in achieving mission goals. In those rare situations where multiple squads are assigned to the same ship or facility, they are generally paired into platoons, with the junior squad leader falling under the command of the senior.
Players of squad leader characters may choose skills from the Firearms, Military, and Physical Disciplines pools.
Generally, these characters begin in the upper enlisted ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a squad leader includes an assault rifle, a combat knife, one of each grenade type, and body armor with helmet array and transponder.

Radio Operator: Communications are essential in field operations, whether between squads. with a command post, or with a squad's ship, It is the task of the radio operator to maintain clear, fast communications in even the worst of situations and to do so without compromising the squad's position or the content of those communications. This requires a thorough knowledge of communications equipment and operating procedures, including such things as radio codes and non-electronic signalling techniques (e.g., semaphore). Unfortunately, the value of the radio operator frequently makes this person a prime target if the enemy is capable of recognizing the radio operator's function and importance.
Radio Operator characters may begin play with skills from the Firearms, Military, and Physical Disciplines pools: they must have both the Comm Gear (Military) skill and the Comm Procedure (Military) specialization.
Typically, these characters rank in the lower to middle enlisted range.
Basic mission equipment for a radio operator includes a heavy pistol with HEJA rounds, a combat knife, body armor with helmet array and transponder. and a combat radio.

Medic: Given a well-stocked sick bay, ship's doctors are capable of handling most medical emergencies. But in ground combat operations, someone has to be on the spot to deliver first aid to casualties and stabilize them for transportation back to those facilities. That's the job of a marine squad's medic. When not in combat operations, medics serve as assistants to their ship's doctor, thereby honing their medical skills.
During character creation. medics can receive skills from the Firearms, medicine, and Physical Disciplines pools; they must have First Aid Medicine' skill.
Beginning medic characters generally fail into the lower specialist ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a medic includes an assault rifle, a combat knife, body armor with helmet array and transponder, and a medkit.

Scout: Although marine squads in general are small and trained to take advantage of cover and concealment during field operations, scouts are true experts in the subjects of infiltration and observation. Often, they are sent individually or in pairs to size up a situation before an entire squad is sent in, in order that the best possible deployment plans can be made.
Players of scout characters may choose skills from the Covert Actions, Firearms, and Physical Disciplines pools for their characters. They must choose the Stealth Covert Actions skill.
Scout characters typically begin in the lower enlisted ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a scout includes a laser sniper rifle. a heavy pistol with splatter rounds, a combat knife, four smoke grenades, and body armor with helmet array and transponder.

Heavy Weapons Expert: All UTRPF marines receive at least a modicum of training in a wide range of weaponry, from firearms to grenade launchers to flame throwers. What sets the heavy weapons expert apart is intensive training in heavier, more specialized weapons, including mortars, automated machine guns, and beam generators. One notable result of this training is that heavy weapons experts tend to find themselves assigned to the deadliest missions, because that is where they are most needed.
Players of heavy weapons experts may choose skills from the Firearms, Military, and Physical Disciplines pools. They must choose Heavy Weapons (Firearms) as a skill.
These characters begin play in the specialist ranks, generally toward the middle of the scale.
Basic mission equipment for a heavy weapons expert includes a heavy pistol with HEJA rounds, a combat knife, a grenade launcher with six rounds of each grenade type, a flame thrower, and body armor with helmet array and transponder.

Demolitions Expert: UTRPF troops have a wide range of weapons available to them, from hand guns to flame throwers and mortars. But for some jobs, that just isn't enough. Whether it's breaching a reinforced wall, removing several tons of earth, or obliterating a nest of nasty xenoforms, whenever a really big hole has to be made in a hurry, demolitions is often the best answer. And of course, with that much destructive power at hand, an expert at its use is advisable.
Demolitions Expert characters may receive skills from the Firearms, Military, and Physical Disciplines pools. They must choose the Demolitions [Military] skill.
These characters typically begin play in the lower to middle specialist rank.
Basic mission equipment for a demolitions expert includes an assault rifle, a combat knife,
one of each grenade type, six satchel charges, a notepad computer, and body armor with helmet array and transponder.

Grunt: Of course, the bulk of most marine squads consists of simple foot soldiers. Consequently, this is the one MSO that is always in need of new members and into which new recruits can count on being accepted if they lack the prerequisites for any other MS0s, or if those MSOs are temporarily filled.
Grunt characters can begin play with skills from the Firearms, Personality, and Physical Disciplines pools. There is no particular skill that they must choose, but often thev devote themselves to expertise with one or more particular firearms andlor melee combat skills.
These characters begin the game in the lowest of the enlisted ranks.
Basic mission equipment for a grunt includes an assault rifle with grenade launcher, three launchable frag grenades, two launchable stun grenades, one launchable incendiary grenade, one of each hand grenade type, a combat knife, and body armor with helmet array and transponder.

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2009, 04:19:33 AM »
Determine Rank

To the uninitiated, rank and chain of command in UTRPF may seem a bit complicated, but it all becomes clear if a few basic facts are understood.

First, for historical reasons, the names for ranks are different between aerospace and marine forces, although they both use the same rating structure. That is to say, an E3 (enlisted rate 3) member of the UTRPF marines is paid the same, and bears the same authority, as an aerospace E3, even though the former is called a Private First Class and the latter a Starhand.

Second, the specialized skills demanded by certain MSOs have led to the creation of the Specialist ranks, a short progression of enlisted ranks parallel to the normal series. In terms of chain of command, these specialist ranks are something of an anomaly. In purely military matters, the highest-ranked Specialist (Spec 7) is still subject to command by a E4 Starmate or Lance Corporal, but even higher-ranking members of the normal progression tend to defer to a lower-ranking specialist concerning matters that fall within that specialist's area of expertise. While the wisdom of this dual-line set-up has been questioned often, most authorities agree that the Specialist rank structure is a necessity.

Third, it should be kept in mind that only normal humans are allowed to be commissioned as officers in UTRPF. Humanity wants to keep final command authority firmly in human hands. But the desire to have some sort of officer-like authority in command of a starship even during hyperspace travel - when any normal humans on board are, of necessity, in stasis - has led to the establishment of a line of Warrant Officer ranks parallel to the normal officer ranks. For the sake of easy recognition of rank progression, those warrant officer ranks beyond the first two echo the names of full officer ranks, but with an additional designator-"Star" for aerospace and "Sword" for marines. In effect, then, UTRPF warrant officers serve in the capacity of normal officers in all cases except when human officers are present. As a matter of fact, in practice, the terms "Sword" and "Star" are typically dumped during normal operations, just as the term "Light" is generally ignored unless someone specifically wants to stress at some point the subordination of a Light Lieutenant to a full Lieutenant, or a Light Commander to a full Commander.

PC Starting Rank: In theory, all UTRPF personnel begin their careers at the bottom of the enlisted. warrant officer, or officer (human only) ranks and progress from that point one step at a time, with regular promotions based upon longevity-assuming satisfactory service, of course.

But in practice, some individuals advance in rank much more quickly than do others. Talent at one's MSO has something to do with this, but to a greater extent, the advancement of these individuals is the result of their adeptness at "playing the system." They have an eye for what tests must be taken, what reports must be filed, and whose attention must be drawn in order to gain points toward promotion. Of course, the actual MSO chosen has a great deal to do with a character's rank.

In game terms, then, rank is based upon a character's Presence, with a modifier applied for MSO. The MSO modifiers are listed in the Rank Modifiers table on the next page. To generate a starting rank for your PC. then. add to the character's Presence/2 score the MSO modifier listed and compare the result to the UTRPF Rank Equivalency table.

Note that. as play progresses, your PC's Presence may increase, due to experience. possibly making the character eligible for a rank increase. Of course, eligibility does not mean automatic increase in rank: promotion can only occur at the official authorization of UTRPF headquarters. In other words, actual reception of that new rank will he subject to your GM's discretion and may be delayed for some time due to campaign considerations.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2009, 04:41:36 AM by ob1knorrb »

Offline ob1knorrb

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Re: Character Generation
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2009, 04:20:30 AM »

 

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